Boost your memory by eating right

How diet can help—or harm—your cognitive fitness.

Before you cut into a big T-bone steak with French fries, here is some food for thought: Research suggests that what we eat might have an impact on our ability to remember and our likelihood of developing dementia as we age.

Take that steak you’re about to slice into, for example. It’s loaded with saturated fat, which is known to raise blood levels of unhealthy low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Other kinds of fats, such as trans fats, do the same thing to LDL.

LDL cholesterol builds up in, and damages, arteries. “We know that’s bad for your heart. There is now a lot of evidence that it’s also bad for your brain,” says Dr. Francine Grodstein, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and associate epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital… ➡ Read the entire article at Harvard Health Publications

Source: Boost your memory by eating right | Harvard Health Publications


Feeling Lonely Increases Alzheimer’s Risk | Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation

Older people who report feeling lonely are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, according to a new study from the Netherlands. The subjective feeling of being isolated and alone appeared to be a risk factor for Alzheimer’s, regardless of whether someone was married or had a social network.

For the study, researchers followed 2,173 seniors, ranging in age from 65 to 86. None had dementia at the start of the study, which lasted three years. The researchers assessed their degree of social isolation, including whether they lived alone and lacked a spouse, partner or network of friends, as well as how lonely they reported feeling. About half lived alone, and one in five reported feeling lonely.

Source: Feeling Lonely Increases Alzheimer’s Risk | Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation


Could Alzheimer’s Stem From Infections? It Makes Sense, Experts Say – The New York Times

Provocative new research leads to the hypothesis that infections may produce a fierce reaction that leaves debris in the brain, causing Alzheimer’s.

Source: Could Alzheimer’s Stem From Infections? It Makes Sense, Experts Say – The New York Times